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Journal

A reflective journal of my practice, process, and thoughts.

Posts tagged print
Paste By Numbers / 'Inseparate' / MA Summer Shows
 
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I am delighted to be featured in Round 1 of Paste by Numbers - an exhibition in Hull of large-format poster-printed interpretations of the number 1. My piece draws from the pivot point of my ongoing project - the question of ‘home’, and consists of a halftone-processed cut-out of a Native American tipi. Beneath the tipi is the iOS share icon.

The short video piece I submitted for the 1st Years Interim Show, ‘Inseparate’ began as a series of manipulations of old family photographs cut in half and mirrored to become symmetrical. The first of these I made to accompany the recent write-up of my conversation with Naiara Demnitz. On a basic level here I had Rorschach tests in mind, the internal and the external, using the ‘shed’/home symbol I produced in connection to the CG rendering project and had laser-cut and printed, as a frame around the photographs which fade very slowly into one another over the 6 minutes of the animation. Over the photographs I placed a dark sphere which hovers and dissolves almost imperceptibly and obscures the already elusive detail of the image - a kind of ‘blind spot’ - the opposite of a spotlight, the pursuit of information with a function inverted, a struggle to reconcile fragments of image and memory together and a small analogy for dementia. The blurry rotating circles at the beginning of the video are manipulations of glass lantern slides showing x-rays from a human skull.

I am very grateful to those that installed the piece in the space at Camberwell, and was excited to see how it had been presented when I visited at the weekend - I did not expect the loop across 3 screens and this is actually something that I think holds potential for exhibiting similar works in the future - in terms of my piece it seemed to make a kind of sense, the blue light which Janet described as reading like a reference to the digital in itself (additive, processing), glowing and fading, slow firings, ahead and behind, drew attention to the time-bound nature of the work.

I found the MA Summer Shows to have been full of strong work and sensitively curated. I have since been thinking about practicalities of installation and logistics - what exactly might be possible, and as I push forward practically bearing in mind the advice Alejandro reiterated at the VR workshop in February - keep your work concise physically and practically, particularly in terms of technology, in order for it to be received most effectively - important in terms of AR/VR or film.

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This Is_Land / Process & Print
REIGNITE BRITISH SPIRIT (2).  2018.

REIGNITE BRITISH SPIRIT (2). 2018.

I am still deliberating over the ‘success’, at least in terms of having positively communicated some ideas and questions, of a project I exhibited earlier this year at Artlink Hull, and carried through to the Hull Print Fair last Sunday. ‘This Is _ Land’ grew out as a branch of my research last year, when I realised that my interest in social ecology in relation to migration was very much interwoven with my concerns about geological change, and a number of broad questions bloomed from that: how do we respond to climate change or resource driven migration in humanitarian ways in an age of rising nationalism and an intoxication with borders?

The Banksy piece on Scott Street Bridge in Hull which appeared back in January. To me, it feels gesturally powerful in it’s location at the end of Hull’s City of Culture year, a city in which the majority of voters in the EU Referendum opted to Leave, something which still does not quite correlate with my experience of the general values of the people I have grown up with and around. Maybe this vote was both a decision given to the public and taken away at the same time; personally, I wonder to what extent the result was a demonstration of the stranglehold of right-leaning press and mainstream media power, and rising populism on opinion, promoting experiences of the past lived vicariously, because none of us were there when we knew economic harmony; ‘It didn’t used to be like this’, so the headlines ‘remind’ us. Fear the unknown, for it is worse than it ever was.

The Banksy piece on Scott Street Bridge in Hull which appeared back in January. To me, it feels gesturally powerful in it’s location at the end of Hull’s City of Culture year, a city in which the majority of voters in the EU Referendum opted to Leave, something which still does not quite correlate with my experience of the general values of the people I have grown up with and around. Maybe this vote was both a decision given to the public and taken away at the same time; personally, I wonder to what extent the result was a demonstration of the stranglehold of right-leaning press and mainstream media power, and rising populism on opinion, promoting experiences of the past lived vicariously, because none of us were there when we knew economic harmony; ‘It didn’t used to be like this’, so the headlines ‘remind’ us. Fear the unknown, for it is worse than it ever was.

Part of my objective with the project was, possibly, to have more of an objective. It is part of the nature of my process as it stands, that I simultaneously try to distill, while naturally abstract information. This is perhaps not especially unique, but my aim here was to explore a slightly more ‘direct’ aesthetic - to utilise saturation in order to comment on saturation, and I wanted to play with a type of visual counter-point reflective of the binary modes we are conditioned to process feeling through politically, with at least reductive and at worst catastrophic - and unwanted - results, as a way of opening up questions on what we are being fed by sensationalist news feeds and agendas. The idea of, on some level, subverting convenience was present in this as well. This began to take the form of screenprints from digital manipulations. I am always interested in the suggestion of the halftone as being a mediator, and the screen as a mechanism for processing and transferring information, conferring emotive material, the basis even of an agenda, through the code of black dots (or something like that). This is obviously ingrained in the ‘press’. In parallel to the physical work, I created a separate instagram feed for the project, and as I worked through a range of different combinations and churning of those into screens, it became increasingly clear to me, especially after the Artlink show and in evaluating that, that the digital work seemed much more potent and engaging in it’s digital form, and with the print based work I received better feedback for the pieces that were less busy, with fewer layers. In designing the digital manipulation layers for the screenprint series, drawing from sensationalist tabloid cuttings, screen grabs from pixelated propaganda films and news reports, iOS function symbols, I realise now that they became overwrought and slightly laboured, whereas the digital pieces did what I had originally intended much more effectively. This has brought about a real sense of question for me now as I move forward - what is the physical ‘stamp’ of the print doing that the digital representation isn’t. The question of what it means to digest print digitally is something which I am now thinking about a lot. This context might be creating an interesting ground for innovation in print. In an article from July 2009 on the site Printeresting, exploring a web-based program which allowed the creation of protest-poster style graphics, designed in reaction to the aftermath of elections in Iran of the same year, the term Metaprint was used to describe the generation of the work:

“At the risk of overusing the ‘meta’ prefix, the Internet seems to be creating an era of Metaprint. Historically, images had to be distributed by physical means to affect change. Now, distributed is executed through an electronic network and reaches the audience without a printed component. The print (if there is one) is the last step, a step farmed out to the audience as an optional souvenir.”

Selection of social media post collages, IG: thisis__land, 2018.

Selection of social media post collages, IG: thisis__land, 2018.

The word ‘souvenir’ connotes a number of things and if they tend to be keepsakes or tokens, then there is an element of souvenirs representing memories, or as being ‘reminders’. This is something that also fed into the act of participating in the Print Fair last weekend. Back in the lead up to my spotlight show earlier this year I labelled a number of pieces ‘Reminder’s - postcard size screen prints on reflective card representing geological change and excavation, and these were exhibited beneath larger, more densely layered collage pieces at Artlink. That particular choice of wording ‘souvenir’ in my reading of the article has a slightly negative tone which suggests that the physical piece would essentially be the inactive, obligatory object. This is interesting in itself, and while that’s not necessarily representative of how I feel at this point about print work (the physical piece can ask of a small investigation from the viewer, is a gestural communication, is a space, and is an important mode of presentation in so many ways whether this is referring to a mounted piece, a print in a smallholder’s display rack, a publication), the argument is compelling and something I intend to be mindful of in my process - the pursuit of making work engaging in a saturated environment, and using those platforms which are now very much a mainstream visual currency, inside and outside of the gallery; the screen.

In evaluating the project now, I can identify a few important action points for moving forward. The work I have made so far has bloomed into a broad collection - probably broader than I had originally intended, interrogating a range of visual sources from life rafts in online museum collections and tabloid articles perpetuating misinformed immigration hysteria, to technicolour renderings of oil spills and ecological catastrophe in 1970s National Geographic issues and photographs of thawed animal remains from the Siberian permafrost. This wide, exploratory approach both in terms of subjects and mediums has led me to reshaping my intentions. In a return to the basic questions I had at the beginning of the year, I have recently begun discussing social ecology and political myth with regards to nationalism and climate change, with Dr Jeremy F. G. Moulton, Associate Lecturer in Environmental Politics at the University of York, and these discussions are having a significant impact on my knowledge of the issues surrounding my concerns. In a collaborative spirit we are continuing to ask questions of one another’s concerns from the perspectives of our individual practices and experiences, and I am planning on publishing transcriptions of these conversations online soon, as part of a dedicated This _ Land __ site. The site will also feed from the project instagram account, and be a screen-based experience and space for continually developing visual work, as I learn more about the specific contexts I am addressing and how my experiences of those have been shaped, through related ideas and possibilities arising from collaboration.

What I stand for is what I stand on.
— Wendell Berry
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As Above, So Below
 
 

animation from gelatin prints, fossils from east yorkshire coast, 2018

… because photographs trigger a memory reflex, the scene they depict takes on a personal significance that is like a shadow and cannot be fixed precisely. This is an unconscious mechanism, silently nagging the viewer (Where does this fit in my life? Was I there?) . The places are also, of course, points on the earth, coordinates in what we call our environment, that which envelops us. In this sense they are part of a different history, but one that is much harder to comprehend, the story of a planet that has existed for more than 4 billion years before humans. This too is part of our collective unconscious. - Saylor/Morris, ‘A History of the Future’.

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One of the main threads of my practice is the idea that the only resource we have is the past, and the question of how this informs the production of visual work in relation to new technologies is something that lies at the roots for me. I am interested in the idea of the ‘time-stamp’ - fixing and unfixing a moment, and chasing the absence of a memory. This roughly began a few years ago when I decided to delve into some boxes of photographs my Nanna left behind. One in particular stood out to me, and has fixated me ever since, and this is the one you can see above. There is a shadow of a man visible in the shed, but I can’t quite see who it is. I realise that the threads of curiosity that are bound up in this can be traced back through my practice, more widely through an exploration of natural history as a field of accumulating agendas and constructs in parallel to the ‘true’ natural history of the earth, and back through my life and experiences of being a witness to various neurological diseases in my grandparents as a young person. These are perhaps both small chronicles of mystery, accumulation and loss. For these reasons the aesthetics of the archive appeal to me and sometimes I make use of this in the way I mine for historical visuals and found objects to form projections of the present, and is intrinsic to the properties of print in general. Joseph Beuys has been an influence on me in this area.

Prior to uncovering those photograph, I either actively or unconsciously avoided any personal material. The last thing I want to do is make work that is sentimental and I think this is maybe partly the reason why. More and more however I’ve realised that there is an emotive core to my practice which maybe bears potent relationships to geological process, and those threads of exploration into natural history and the archive make sense in terms of my interest in what is happening on the surface - on and between land, and below the surface - those shifting and mysterious stratifications of hidden matter which are largely absent from our active thought. Gradual change over time. I’ve spent a lot of time visiting and investigating the rapidly eroding cliffs which are eating into an agricultural area known as Holderness, on which my family lived and worked for decades and is pictured in those tiny polaroids fixating me. Thomas Sheppard’s ‘Geological Rambles in East Yorkshire’ (1903) served as a way of understanding some of the muddied and isolated locations, and became a starting point for a consideration of how this area of landmass which features the fastest eroding coastline in Europe, with bolder clay rich in fossilized life forms from ice age glacial deposits, is fragmenting and reforming like a society itself – the wear and tear of the people on the surface, the wear and tear of the crumbling clay and the shifting forces beneath our feet. I have begun to collect those fossils and make contact prints from them as an immediate visual starting point.

I am interested in the metaphysical, and the potential of the term ‘the fossil record’ as being a description of the recorded human memory of experiences of a landscape and relationships as much as it stands for a scientific collection of measurable and agreed historical evidence. The fossil record is, of course, notably incomplete. What does generation loss look like in the earth? Are there ways in which we gravitate towards anxiety in our psychological landscapes that might be reflected in the visualization of the gaps in the fossil record – in data and collections? Are there parallels to be drawn and associations to be unearthed between neurological disease, memory loss, and geological processes such as erosion and overprinting, at a point in time at which the geologic, biologic and technologic are becoming so much more tightly bound and blurred? These are all broad questions, which I seek to investigate, to distil, and push the boundaries of.